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Tuesday, January 17

  1. page Steven Phan review 1 edited ... —- Junior, p11 Book Review The main character is Junior, an Indian who is very unpopular. …
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    —- Junior, p11
    Book Review
    The main character is Junior, an Indian who is very unpopular. He lives on the Spokane Indian Reservation. He goes to a school where everywhere you go, you seen an Indian. So basically it is not diversed. Junior was born with variety of physical disabilities. Junior does not really have friends, in matter of fact, Junior only has one friend. His one friend is also his best friend who is Rowdy. Rowdy grew up with a tough family. His dad was abusive, & alcoholic. He builds up frustrstion from that therefore, Rowdy beats up almost everyone. Except for Junior, who is very scrawny. Rowdy is protective of Junior. " I wanted to tell him that he was my best friend and i love him like crazy, but boys didn't say such things to other boys, and nobody said such things to Rowdy" (Junior, page 48)
    Junior is not like the other kids, he actually enjoys going to school in learning. One day during class, he started to get frustrated with the lack of educational resources available on the Reservation. Junior then threw the textbook that he had, across the classroom. THUMP! Unintentionally, Junior accidentally threw the textbook at his teacher, Mr. P . Obviously, Junior is suspended from school. But then all of a sudden, Mr. P comes to visit Junior at his home. Junior is expecting Mr. P to yell/complain to his parents. But surprisingly, Mr. P apologizes to Junior for how he and his teacher had been treating the Indian children. Mr. P knows that he is very very intelligent, and Mr.P knows that Junior has potential. But the only way he can succeed is by getting off the reservation.
    Junior thinks about what Mr.P recommended him. Slowly but surely, Junior decides to leave the reservation & attend Reardan, about twenty miles away from Junior's home. His parents are very supportive about his decision. But Rowdy, he reacts differently. When Junior broke the news to Rowdy, Rowdy starts to tears up. He then gets furious and the punches Junior in the face violently. Rowdy felt like he was getting back stabbed. Junior was his best friend, but now his bestfriend is going to leave. Who is he going to have now?.
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Monday, June 20

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  2. page DulcineaAlderton edited Some report about a book I hold at hight regard..
    Some report about a book I hold at hight regard..
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Sunday, June 19

  1. page Evan Vecziedins Review 2 edited ... It all begins with the main character Raskolnikov waking up in his pretty shoddily made room, …
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    It all begins with the main character Raskolnikov waking up in his pretty shoddily made room, but, unlike other days, he's troubled by something else. Raskolnikov thinks about this problem on the way to a market district. All we know is that Raskolnikov thinks the action he's about to act on is good and justified, but in terms of law it is revealed the action in question is illegal. Eventually, Rodya (Raskolnikov) arrives at a pawnshop and sells his father's watch to help him in his poor position. Upon seeing the pawnbroker, Alyona Ivanovna, it is revealed what Rodya plans to kill Alyona and take her money to prove something. The thing Rodya's proving is his theory that the world is divided into the extraordinary and the ordinary, the people who change the world and those who follow, and he believes the extraordinary are above the law so long as what crime they commit is used to further a change to improve lives. Rodya believes himself to be one of the extraordinary, and thus he wants to prove his theory; however, Rodya can't do it to the scale of other "extraordinaries" like Napoleon, but he can do it on a smaller town scale as Alyona is a cruel women who treats her sweet sister Lizaveta like a slave. Alyona doesn't pay enough to people selling items and has dirt on many people too. Thus, to Rodya's mind getting rid of her seems like the best test of his theory. Rodya's only problem is that he believes he couldn't bring himself to do it, nor does he think he can pull it off if he did bring himself to do it (one of the main questions of the book is whether you believe him to be good, bad, or insane).
    After leaving his business with Alyona, Rodya finds himself at a bar talking to an older drunk named Marmeladov. Apparently, Marmeladov has a strange "condition" where the more he's drunk, the more reasonable he is. Anyway, you learn Marmeladov's life with his four children and his wife, Katerina. Marmeledov's life is apparently worse than you may think because his family is loving him, and he's the cause of why they are in a horrid position. Even though Katerina was born into high society, Marmeladov's unsreasonable drinking habits (he's less logical when he's not drunk) have caused them to be always on the poverty line. Marmeladov feels sorry that his three stepchildren, the children from Katerina's first marriage, are not given a good education because they are just old enough to start going to school. Marmeladov also feels that he's undeserving of Katerina's love as she can be married to someone such as those of the court of the tsar. Oh, I forgot to mention this takes place in Russia just before Russia's coup d'etat in the February Revolution. Anyway, while Katerina does seem to be a bit hostile towards her husband, in reality, she is just trying to do her best to keep Marmeladov from tearing down their family. Katerina is actually pretty sweet to Marmeladov because even though she works much harder, she knows that he has an addiction that is hard to get out of and she tries to love him as best as she can. Marmeladov is revealed to feel so sorry for her and her family being reduced to poverty; Marmeldov even says that while Katerina is a sweet wife it just hurts him to see her, a sophisticated and intelligent women, and her children be reduced to poverty and still love him despite what he does. However, Marmeladov's daughter, Sonia (or Sonya in correct Russian translation), is probably in the worst position. Sonia is about eighteen years old, and thus, Sonia is old enough work; however, the only problem is that no one during this time period would hire a women who is on the poverty line, and Sonia has to work since Katerina is making her work otherwise Sonia would have to be far away from her family. With little options, Sonia resorts to a job that isn't very respected back during the days of the Russian Empire, and a job that we in the twenty-first century don't respect either – prostitution. Sonia is far too sweet to like such a job, but it is the only job she can currently get to help support her family. After Marmeladov tells his gloomy story, Rodya brings him home to his family. After giving money to Marmeladov's family, Rodya leaves for his apartment.
    ...
    apartment, Rodya recievesreceives a long
    First off, I have two things that really kept me reading the book. First, is the greater focus on character development and the thoughts of characters. Second, the focus on philosophical and hard to answer questions. For example, when looking at Rodya's theory I had questions like, "Is it right to kill in order to make things better?" and "If his theory rings with truth, then is there a point when these extraordinaries go to far?". Each question you or I can have throughout the book has multiple views that can have multiple answers. Sometimes the book doesn't even give us an answer. In moments where I receive no answer, I can only assume it has multiple answers that are meant to check where you, as the reader, stands. Those decisions are thus, hard to decide as they ask more than which option is correct, but which option is the best according you, the reader. Enough about that for now, let's get into the first reason I like this book.
    To contrast with your thoughts (like I discussed at the end of the last paragraph), how about the character's thoughts, fears, and dreams. A highlight of the books is that the the book focuses on the character's thoughts more than other books who keep more of a balance on actions and thoughts. This even happens even during the only times where the pace changes in the book as exemplified in, “Fear gained more and more mastery over him, especially after this second, quite unexpected murder. He longed to run away from the place as fast as possible. And if at that moment he had been capable of seeing and reasoning more correctly, if he had been able to realize all the difficulties of his position, the hopelessness, the hideousness and the absurdity of it, if he could have understood how many obstacles and, perhaps, crimes he had still to overcome or to commit, to get out of that place and to make his way home, it is very possible that he would have flung up everything, and would have gone to give himself up, and not from fear, but from simple horror and loathing of what he had done." (Dostoyevsky 178-79, iBooks). This shows how the character feels and thinks not by simply stating it, but by devoting entire pages to it. Yes, this entire quote can be criminally simplified to Rodya is terrified after the prospect of the murder, yet this books goes in depth telling the extent of that thought or emotion. However, specifically, our main character's philosophical mind gets looked at the most, and that usually is provoking the hard questions to the readers as stated earlier. It also helps show a character's change in behavior such as with Rodya himself going from a planning and calm demeanor to overly paranoid. This can be seen in the quote, “'Who is he? Who is that man who sprang out of the earth? Where was he, what did he see? He has seen it all, that’s clear. Where was he then? And from where did he see? Why has he only now sprung out of the earth? And how could he see? Is it possible? Hm . . .' continued Raskolnikov, turning cold and shivering, 'and the jewel case Nikolay found behind the door — was that possible? A clue? You miss an infinitesimal line and you can build it into a pyramid of evidence! A fly flew by and saw it! Is it possible?'" (Dostoyevsky 585-686, iBooks). This further shows the natural progression of Rodya changing from a calm mind to paranoia. Thus, describing a change, feeling, and thought with a greater focus than most books. However, this greater focus on characters' thoughts and feelings causes a negative of the book to unintentionally appear, but I'll discuss that later.
    ...
    of God (that was an uncomfortable part of the book) with Sofia
    ...
    interest very quickly.First,quickly. First, the pacing
    ...
    brought the axeax down, his
    Besides that, I can't think of many other real issues besides nitpicking certain parts. Anyways, if you're into philosophy and a bit of slice o' life style of writings or if you just want something different than action for once, then I highly suggest picking up this book. I enjoyed the book, my mother enjoyed it, my teacher enjoyed it, and perhaps you will too. If anything else, this book will have you pondering for more than a while.
    About the Author
    ...
    November 11,1821.
    His
    His father was
    ...
    and The Possesed.Possessed. It was
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    criticize the so {https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/6/6e/Fyodor_Mikhailovich_Dostoyevsky_1876.jpg}
    {https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/6/6e/Fyodor_Mikhailovich_Dostoyevsky_1876.jpg}
    socialists are
    A Few Other Books
    {https://www.free-ebooks.net/2d_covers/large/1166075444.jpg} {https://bibliophilewannabe.files.wordpress.com/2012/11/white-nights.jpg} {http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-OmsRQqCqKW0/T_D3MqH0XcI/AAAAAAAAACs/lkUbQP-ysdo/s1600/KaramazovCover_FSociety6.jpg}
    Just a Few Other Things

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  2. page Evan Vecziedins Review 2 edited ... “In his article all men are divided into ‘ordinary’ and ‘extraordinary.’ Ordinary men have to …
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    “In his article all men are divided into ‘ordinary’ and ‘extraordinary.’ Ordinary men have to live in submission, have no right to transgress the law, because, don’t you see, they are ordinary. But extraordinary men have a right to commit any crime and to transgress the law in any way, just because they are extraordinary. That was your idea, if I am not mistaken?” (Dostoyevsky 555, iBooks)
    Intro
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    can reveal that,that and the
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    and Punishment.
    It
    {http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/514QH1QCDEL.jpg}
    It
    all begins
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    into the extraodinaryextraordinary and the
    ...
    "extraordinaries" like Napolean,Napoleon, but he
    After leaving his business with Alyona, Rodya finds himself at a bar talking to an older drunk named Marmeladov. Apparently, Marmeladov has a strange "condition" where the more he's drunk, the more reasonable he is. Anyway, you learn Marmeladov's life with his four children and his wife, Katerina. Marmeledov's life is apparently worse than you may think because his family is loving him, and he's the cause of why they are in a horrid position. Even though Katerina was born into high society, Marmeladov's unsreasonable drinking habits (he's less logical when he's not drunk) have caused them to be always on the poverty line. Marmeladov feels sorry that his three stepchildren, the children from Katerina's first marriage, are not given a good education because they are just old enough to start going to school. Marmeladov also feels that he's undeserving of Katerina's love as she can be married to someone such as those of the court of the tsar. Oh, I forgot to mention this takes place in Russia just before Russia's coup d'etat in the February Revolution. Anyway, while Katerina does seem to be a bit hostile towards her husband, in reality, she is just trying to do her best to keep Marmeladov from tearing down their family. Katerina is actually pretty sweet to Marmeladov because even though she works much harder, she knows that he has an addiction that is hard to get out of and she tries to love him as best as she can. Marmeladov is revealed to feel so sorry for her and her family being reduced to poverty; Marmeldov even says that while Katerina is a sweet wife it just hurts him to see her, a sophisticated and intelligent women, and her children be reduced to poverty and still love him despite what he does. However, Marmeladov's daughter, Sonia (or Sonya in correct Russian translation), is probably in the worst position. Sonia is about eighteen years old, and thus, Sonia is old enough work; however, the only problem is that no one during this time period would hire a women who is on the poverty line, and Sonia has to work since Katerina is making her work otherwise Sonia would have to be far away from her family. With little options, Sonia resorts to a job that isn't very respected back during the days of the Russian Empire, and a job that we in the twenty-first century don't respect either – prostitution. Sonia is far too sweet to like such a job, but it is the only job she can currently get to help support her family. After Marmeladov tells his gloomy story, Rodya brings him home to his family. After giving money to Marmeladov's family, Rodya leaves for his apartment.
    After a long sleep at his apartment, Rodya recieves a long letter rom his mother, Pulcheria, about how Rodya's sister, Dounia, doesn't have to work as a nanny for the Svidrigailov family. The reason Pulcheria is telling Rodya this is because no one in Rodya's family liked Dounia's job – including Dounia. Apparently, Mr.Svidrgailov was sexually harassing Dounia for the whole time she was there, but Dounia owed the family money so she couldn't leave until recently in the story. While being able to leave that job is great, it seems that Dounia's only picking her poison. I say this because Dounia is now planning to marry a man named Luzhin who is in St. Petersburg which is where Rodya is. Luzhin is not a good husband because he's a very pompous and shallow rich guy who only sees Dounia as a prize to be won. Luzhin is basically only marrying Dounia to be his trophy wife, but instead of treating her well, he'd only marry her to make her his own slave. He even thinks that when you switch to his point of view in the book. Rodya does not like Luzhin and plans to confront him about the marriage; Rodya also plans to confront Pulcheria and Dounia about the marriage as he thinks Dounia is only marrying Luzhin to help himself as Rodya is very impoverished despite being a student. All the while the day is dawning. The dawn of the day to carry out murder and see the results. With so many problems going on explore how are so called "hero" handles these external problems, but also to help sate his paranoia.Review
    First off, I have two things that really kept me reading the book. First, is the greater focus on character development and the thoughts of characters. Second, the focus on philosophical and hard to answer questions. For example, when looking at Rodya's theory I had questions like, "Is it right to kill in order to make things better?" and "If his theory rings with truth, then is there a point when these extraordinaries go to far?". Each question you or I can have throughout the book has multiple views that can have multiple answers. Sometimes the book doesn't even give us an answer. In moments where I receive no answer, I can only assume it has multiple answers that are meant to check where you, as the reader, stands. Those decisions are thus, hard to decide as they ask more than which option is correct, but which option is the best according you, the reader. Enough about that for now, let's get into the first reason I like this book.
    ...
    on the charater'scharacter's thoughts more
    ...
    able to realiserealize all the
    Next, is the other part I like about the book, the thought provoking questions. When do actions that change the world go too far, who is extraordinary, how can you tell, does being ordinary make you inferior, and would you kill to make the world a better place? Basically, this book is about Fyodor's philosophies and musings. Thankfully, he doesn't force-feed you his philosophy and say it's the best idea like other authors (i.e. Stalin, Thomas More, and even Lao Tzu), but instead Fyodor just states his view in the form of a question and leaves you to answer it. For example, “I maintain that if the discoveries of Kepler and Newton could not have been made known except by sacrificing the lives of one, a dozen, a hundred, or more men, Newton would have had the right, would indeed have been in duty bound . . . to eliminate the dozen or the hundred men for the sake of making his discoveries known to the whole of humanity.” (Dostoyevsky 556, iBooks). The philosophy is only shown via questions raised by statements throughout the book, and this one simply states, given the circumstances, "Would you do it?". Fyodor also delves into pretty deep topics such as the aspects of marriage with Marmeladov, love with Sofia and a certain person (spoilers), the nature of God (that was an uncomfortable part of the book) with Sofia and Rodya, and the fine line between the just and the criminal (the book is called Crime and Punishment after all). Fyodor even discusses communism and socialism versus capitalism with Razumhin, Rodya's best friend, and Luzhin. By the way Fyodor's viewpoint isn't biased towards the side you might think because he actual doesn't condone the faults of Marx's ideas.
    Regrettably, there are always faults in all works of art and they may make some people lose interest very quickly.First, the pacing is not incorrect for the book, but it never really changes all to much even when getting away with (spoilers) murder. This pacing remains on par with the calm demeanor Rodya has for a lot of the book even during murder in this part, “He had not a minute more to lose. He pulled the ax quickly out, swung it with both arms, scarcely conscious of himself, and almost without effort, almost mechanically, brought the blunt side down on her head. He seemed not to use his own strength in this. But as soon as he had once brought the axe down, his strength returned to him. The old woman was as always bareheaded. Her thin, light hair, streaked with grey, thickly smeared with grease, was plaited in a rat’s tail and fastened by a broken horn comb which stood out on the nape of her neck. As she was so short, the blow fell on the very top of her skull. She cried out, but very faintly, and suddenly sank all of a heap on the floor, raising her hands to her head. In one hand she still held “the pledge.” Then he dealt her another and another blow with the blunt side and on the same spot. The blood gushed as from an overturned glass, the body fell back.” (Dostoyevsky 171-72, iBooks). You may have not noticed in the quote, but while reading this quote, it seemed slow compared to other parts like this in other books. That is only my opinion, but others , including my mother, agree. It deserves to be acknowledged because some of those people, like my mother, enjoyed the book. The book always seems to go at the same pace, but I just realized now that's not always the case. To Fyodor's credit when a section of the book involves Rodya's paranoia, one on one discussions of importance, or if Ryoda is being questioned by someone who is trying to prove he's the murderer; Fyodor occasionally picks up the pacing and suspense. He also slows it down on certain parts especially those involving Sonia and a certain someone. Speaking of which, I'd like to take this time to say while a bunch of people are ruined or "get the ax" (morbid pun for those who've read the book), the ending involving Sonia is one of the best ways to end a story that I've seen in a while. Plus, while the ending is bitter-sweet, it is a ray of hope in an otherwise gloomy, dark, and serious book. Anyway, due to a lack of fast pacing this book is not for everyone because while the slower and constant pacing fits, it's not exhilarating. Thus, if your a person who enjoys the suspense of the horror genre, the epic scale of the Lord of the Rings series, the thrill of action, but can't stand the philosophical thought of men, then this book is not for you.
    ...
    About the Author
    Fyodor Dostoyevsky was born to a Russian couple going through hard times in Moscow on November 11,1821.
    ...
    criticize the so {https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/6/6e/Fyodor_Mikhailovich_Dostoyevsky_1876.jpg} socialists are
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    and psychology.

    A Few Other Books

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  3. page Evan Vecziedins Review 2 edited ... It all begins with the main character Raskolnikov waking up in his pretty shoddily made room, …
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    It all begins with the main character Raskolnikov waking up in his pretty shoddily made room, but, unlike other days, he's troubled by something else. Raskolnikov thinks about this problem on the way to a market district. All we know is that Raskolnikov thinks the action he's about to act on is good and justified, but in terms of law it is revealed the action in question is illegal. Eventually, Rodya (Raskolnikov) arrives at a pawnshop and sells his father's watch to help him in his poor position. Upon seeing the pawnbroker, Alyona Ivanovna, it is revealed what Rodya plans to kill Alyona and take her money to prove something. The thing Rodya's proving is his theory that the world is divided into the extraodinary and the ordinary, the people who change the world and those who follow, and he believes the extraordinary are above the law so long as what crime they commit is used to further a change to improve lives. Rodya believes himself to be one of the extraordinary, and thus he wants to prove his theory; however, Rodya can't do it to the scale of other "extraordinaries" like Napolean, but he can do it on a smaller town scale as Alyona is a cruel women who treats her sweet sister Lizaveta like a slave. Alyona doesn't pay enough to people selling items and has dirt on many people too. Thus, to Rodya's mind getting rid of her seems like the best test of his theory. Rodya's only problem is that he believes he couldn't bring himself to do it, nor does he think he can pull it off if he did bring himself to do it (one of the main questions of the book is whether you believe him to be good, bad, or insane).
    After leaving his business with Alyona, Rodya finds himself at a bar talking to an older drunk named Marmeladov. Apparently, Marmeladov has a strange "condition" where the more he's drunk, the more reasonable he is. Anyway, you learn Marmeladov's life with his four children and his wife, Katerina. Marmeledov's life is apparently worse than you may think because his family is loving him, and he's the cause of why they are in a horrid position. Even though Katerina was born into high society, Marmeladov's unsreasonable drinking habits (he's less logical when he's not drunk) have caused them to be always on the poverty line. Marmeladov feels sorry that his three stepchildren, the children from Katerina's first marriage, are not given a good education because they are just old enough to start going to school. Marmeladov also feels that he's undeserving of Katerina's love as she can be married to someone such as those of the court of the tsar. Oh, I forgot to mention this takes place in Russia just before Russia's coup d'etat in the February Revolution. Anyway, while Katerina does seem to be a bit hostile towards her husband, in reality, she is just trying to do her best to keep Marmeladov from tearing down their family. Katerina is actually pretty sweet to Marmeladov because even though she works much harder, she knows that he has an addiction that is hard to get out of and she tries to love him as best as she can. Marmeladov is revealed to feel so sorry for her and her family being reduced to poverty; Marmeldov even says that while Katerina is a sweet wife it just hurts him to see her, a sophisticated and intelligent women, and her children be reduced to poverty and still love him despite what he does. However, Marmeladov's daughter, Sonia (or Sonya in correct Russian translation), is probably in the worst position. Sonia is about eighteen years old, and thus, Sonia is old enough work; however, the only problem is that no one during this time period would hire a women who is on the poverty line, and Sonia has to work since Katerina is making her work otherwise Sonia would have to be far away from her family. With little options, Sonia resorts to a job that isn't very respected back during the days of the Russian Empire, and a job that we in the twenty-first century don't respect either – prostitution. Sonia is far too sweet to like such a job, but it is the only job she can currently get to help support her family. After Marmeladov tells his gloomy story, Rodya brings him home to his family. After giving money to Marmeladov's family, Rodya leaves for his apartment.
    ...
    is in St.PetersburgSt. Petersburg which is
    First off, I have two things that really kept me reading the book. First, is the greater focus on character development and the thoughts of characters. Second, the focus on philosophical and hard to answer questions. For example, when looking at Rodya's theory I had questions like, "Is it right to kill in order to make things better?" and "If his theory rings with truth, then is there a point when these extraordinaries go to far?". Each question you or I can have throughout the book has multiple views that can have multiple answers. Sometimes the book doesn't even give us an answer. In moments where I receive no answer, I can only assume it has multiple answers that are meant to check where you, as the reader, stands. Those decisions are thus, hard to decide as they ask more than which option is correct, but which option is the best according you, the reader. Enough about that for now, let's get into the first reason I like this book.
    To contrast with your thoughts (like I discussed at the end of the last paragraph), how about the character's thoughts, fears, and dreams. A highlight of the books is that the the book focuses on the charater's thoughts more than other books who keep more of a balance on actions and thoughts. This even happens even during the only times where the pace changes in the book as exemplified in, “Fear gained more and more mastery over him, especially after this second, quite unexpected murder. He longed to run away from the place as fast as possible. And if at that moment he had been capable of seeing and reasoning more correctly, if he had been able to realise all the difficulties of his position, the hopelessness, the hideousness and the absurdity of it, if he could have understood how many obstacles and, perhaps, crimes he had still to overcome or to commit, to get out of that place and to make his way home, it is very possible that he would have flung up everything, and would have gone to give himself up, and not from fear, but from simple horror and loathing of what he had done." (Dostoyevsky 178-79, iBooks). This shows how the character feels and thinks not by simply stating it, but by devoting entire pages to it. Yes, this entire quote can be criminally simplified to Rodya is terrified after the prospect of the murder, yet this books goes in depth telling the extent of that thought or emotion. However, specifically, our main character's philosophical mind gets looked at the most, and that usually is provoking the hard questions to the readers as stated earlier. It also helps show a character's change in behavior such as with Rodya himself going from a planning and calm demeanor to overly paranoid. This can be seen in the quote, “'Who is he? Who is that man who sprang out of the earth? Where was he, what did he see? He has seen it all, that’s clear. Where was he then? And from where did he see? Why has he only now sprung out of the earth? And how could he see? Is it possible? Hm . . .' continued Raskolnikov, turning cold and shivering, 'and the jewel case Nikolay found behind the door — was that possible? A clue? You miss an infinitesimal line and you can build it into a pyramid of evidence! A fly flew by and saw it! Is it possible?'" (Dostoyevsky 585-686, iBooks). This further shows the natural progression of Rodya changing from a calm mind to paranoia. Thus, describing a change, feeling, and thought with a greater focus than most books. However, this greater focus on characters' thoughts and feelings causes a negative of the book to unintentionally appear, but I'll discuss that later.
    ...
    Crime and PunishmenPunishment after all).
    ...
    pulled the axe quiteax quickly out, swung
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    "get the axe"ax" (morbid pun
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    stand the philisophicalphilosophical thought of
    Besides that, I can't think of many other real issues besides nitpicking certain parts. Anyways, if you're into philosophy and a bit of slice o' life style of writings or if you just want something different than action for once, then I highly suggest picking up this book. I enjoyed the book, my mother enjoyed it, my teacher enjoyed it, and perhaps you will too. If anything else, this book will have you pondering for more than a while.
    About the Author
    Fyodor Dostoyevsky was born to a Russian couple going through hard times in Moscow on November 11,1821.
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    to Russian similiarlysimilarly to Ryoda
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    the Dead. TheThe first book
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    brutality and cruelycruelly of the
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    and psychology.
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  4. page Evan Vecziedins Review 2 edited ... About the Author Fyodor Dostoyevsky was born to a Russian couple going through hard times in …
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    About the Author
    Fyodor Dostoyevsky was born to a Russian couple going through hard times in Moscow on November 11,1821.
    ...
    Vissarion Belinsky". Throughout the next few years, many of his works became celebrated, increasing Fyodor's fame. These books are White Nights, The Double, and The Possesed. It was only after Fyodor was arrested for being in a circle against serfdom and communism that he was able to write Crime and Punishment because after being so close to death row. By the way, the tsar instead sent Fyodor to Siberia. In Siberia, Fyodor wrote The Idiot and The House of the Dead. The first book being about a man on the verge of death row as Fyodor was, and the latter book was about the brutality and cruely of the Siberian work and prison camps (Baltic people like myself know that all to well). On his return to Russia from his sentence, he continued to fight the radicals and Bolshevieks by writing about their contempt of free thought, creativity, individuality, materialism, diversity of thought, and a morality that favors logic not spirit and emotion. Those primary books that Fyodor used to criticize the socialists are Epoch and Time which he wrote in the 1860s. Fyodor's biggest strike against the radicals is Notes from the Underground, an attack on all the Soviets believed: a lack of freedom of choice, history is built only by laws, and that a utopia on Earth is possible. Simply put, the people who rationalize for perfection and create systems to achieve that are the greatest fools in existence, and often the irrational people who make solutions create better lives, freedom versus absolute order. Eventually, Fyodor wrote his last book, The Brothers Karamazov. A fitting book to end off on as it discusses almost all his views on the world that made his books so famous. Instead of focusing on one to three main thoughts of Fyodor, the book focused on all of Fyodor's views on religion, philosophy, and psychology.
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  5. page Evan Vecziedins Review 2 edited ... About the Author Fyodor Dostoyevsky was born to a Russian couple going through hard times in …
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    About the Author
    Fyodor Dostoyevsky was born to a Russian couple going through hard times in Moscow on November 11,1821.
    His father was a military surgeon working to help the poor at the Mariinsky Hospital for the Poor , and his mother was born to a highly respected merchant family. Due to his father's surprisingly low-paying job, Fyodor himself had to work through hardship and poor funding through in his younger years in order to help support his family, but all that would change after his father received a noble status and great opportunities for wealth due to Tsar Peter the First's reforms. Thus, he would receive a great education at his father's country estate and later at a school alone with his older brother, and closest friend, Mikhail, but the education was for becoming a military engineer, not a writer. Later, after his mother died 1837 and his father of unknown causes in 1839, Fyodor and Mikhail quit their father's chosen occupation for them, and Fyodor and Mikhail would enter on to the literary stage in a writer-publisher partnership. At first, they simply translated different foreign works to Russian similiarly to Ryoda in Fyodor's Crime and Punishment (Fyodor often used parallels to his own life in his books), but it wouldn't belong before Fyodor rose out of obscurity when he wrote Poor Folk in 1846. Soon, Fyodor was praised by one of Russia's most brutal literary critics, the "Furious Vissarion Belinsky".
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  6. page Luc Parriott review 2 edited Pendragon, {https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/thumb/c/c4/DJMacHale_TheNeverWar.jpg/220…

    Pendragon,
    {https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/thumb/c/c4/DJMacHale_TheNeverWar.jpg/220px-DJMacHale_TheNeverWar.jpg}
    Pendragon,
    The Never War

    Author: D. J. MacHale
    Review By: Luc Parriott
    “Where is First Earth? The better question is, when is First Earth? I’m in New York City and it’s 1937. March of 1937 to be exact. To be really exact, it’s March 11 of 1937. I’m writing this on my birthday. Here’s a weird thought: If I’m in 1937 and it’s my birthday, did I still turn fifteen? Kind of freaky, no?” (Page 1)
    Rewiew
    This book is a great read. It is very intriguing and interesting. The book gives you a sense of an adventure that seems very realistic but is impossible. I highly recommend this book to everyone, especially sci-fi and adventure readers.
    This book is the second book in the series. The book is about a teenager named Bobby Pendragon. He is a “Traveler” or time traveler. He goes on adventures through time and space and solves huge problems. In this book he goes to a place called First Earth with his friend, Vo Spader, who is a traveler from a place called Cloral. He meets another traveler named Gunny. Gunny is a World War One veteran. The main antagonist is the New York mafia.
    The main problem in the book is centered around the airship, the Hindenburg. The travelers are trying to save first earth from a man named Saint Dane. They believe that the Hindenburg is part of Saint Dane's plan to destroy First Earth, Second Earth (Present) and Third Earth (Future).
    About D. J. MacHale
    D. J. MacHale is from Greenwich, CT. He attend the High School there. He also worked on a poultry farm collecting eggs. He got a BFA in film production from New York University. He started his career making commercials. He wrote tons of books, including the Pendragon series. He also co-created the Nickelodeon show, “Are you afraid of the dark?”. He now lives in Southern California with his wife, daughter, dog, and cat. They backpack, scuba dive and ski together.

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  7. page Evan Vecziedins Review 2 edited ... Next, is the other part I like about the book, the thought provoking questions. When do action…
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    Next, is the other part I like about the book, the thought provoking questions. When do actions that change the world go too far, who is extraordinary, how can you tell, does being ordinary make you inferior, and would you kill to make the world a better place? Basically, this book is about Fyodor's philosophies and musings. Thankfully, he doesn't force-feed you his philosophy and say it's the best idea like other authors (i.e. Stalin, Thomas More, and even Lao Tzu), but instead Fyodor just states his view in the form of a question and leaves you to answer it. For example, “I maintain that if the discoveries of Kepler and Newton could not have been made known except by sacrificing the lives of one, a dozen, a hundred, or more men, Newton would have had the right, would indeed have been in duty bound . . . to eliminate the dozen or the hundred men for the sake of making his discoveries known to the whole of humanity.” (Dostoyevsky 556, iBooks). The philosophy is only shown via questions raised by statements throughout the book, and this one simply states, given the circumstances, "Would you do it?". Fyodor also delves into pretty deep topics such as the aspects of marriage with Marmeladov, love with Sofia and a certain person (spoilers), the nature of God (that was an uncomfortable part of the book) with Sofia and Rodya, and the fine line between the just and the criminal (the book is called Crime and Punishmen after all). Fyodor even discusses communism and socialism versus capitalism with Razumhin, Rodya's best friend, and Luzhin. By the way Fyodor's viewpoint isn't biased towards the side you might think because he actual doesn't condone the faults of Marx's ideas.
    Regrettably, there are always faults in all works of art and they may make some people lose interest very quickly.First, the pacing is not incorrect for the book, but it never really changes all to much even when getting away with (spoilers) murder. This pacing remains on par with the calm demeanor Rodya has for a lot of the book even during murder in this part, “He had not a minute more to lose. He pulled the axe quite out, swung it with both arms, scarcely conscious of himself, and almost without effort, almost mechanically, brought the blunt side down on her head. He seemed not to use his own strength in this. But as soon as he had once brought the axe down, his strength returned to him. The old woman was as always bareheaded. Her thin, light hair, streaked with grey, thickly smeared with grease, was plaited in a rat’s tail and fastened by a broken horn comb which stood out on the nape of her neck. As she was so short, the blow fell on the very top of her skull. She cried out, but very faintly, and suddenly sank all of a heap on the floor, raising her hands to her head. In one hand she still held “the pledge.” Then he dealt her another and another blow with the blunt side and on the same spot. The blood gushed as from an overturned glass, the body fell back.” (Dostoyevsky 171-72, iBooks). You may have not noticed in the quote, but while reading this quote, it seemed slow compared to other parts like this in other books. That is only my opinion, but others , including my mother, agree. It deserves to be acknowledged because some of those people, like my mother, enjoyed the book. The book always seems to go at the same pace, but I just realized now that's not always the case. To Fyodor's credit when a section of the book involves Rodya's paranoia, one on one discussions of importance, or if Ryoda is being questioned by someone who is trying to prove he's the murderer; Fyodor occasionally picks up the pacing and suspense. He also slows it down on certain parts especially those involving Sonia and a certain someone. Speaking of which, I'd like to take this time to say while a bunch of people are ruined or "get the axe" (morbid pun for those who've read the book), the ending involving Sonia is one of the best ways to end a story that I've seen in a while. Plus, while the ending is bitter-sweet, it is a ray of hope in an otherwise gloomy, dark, and serious book. Anyway, due to a lack of fast pacing this book is not for everyone because while the slower and constant pacing fits, it's not exhilarating. Thus, if your a person who enjoys the suspense of the horror genre, the epic scale of the Lord of the Rings series, the thrill of action, but can't stand the philisophical thought of men, then this book is not for you.
    ...
    than a while.Aboutwhile.
    About
    the Author
    ...
    November 11,1821. His

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